The Power of Full Engagement: Summary Review

Key Things You Should Know About The Book

This is a summary review of The Power of Full Engagement containing key details about the book.

What is The Power of Full Engagement About?

The Power of Full Engagement teaches us that managing energy, not time, is the key to enduring high performance as well as to health, happiness, and life balance. The book is a practical, scientifically-based approach to managing our energy more skillfully both on and off the job by laying out the key training principles.

Who is the Author of The Power of Full Engagement?

Dr. Jim Loehr is a bestselling author and a world-renowned performance psychologist, Co-Founder of the Human Performance Institute, and author of more than a dozen books including his most recent, The Only Way to Win.

Tony Schwartz is a bestselling author and the President and CEO of The Energy Project, which helps individuals and organizations perform at their best. Tony’s last book, The Power of Full Engagement, co-authored with Jim Loehr, was a Wall Street Journal and New York Times bestseller and has been translated into more than 20 languages.

How long is The Power of Full Engagement?

  • Print length: 222 pages
  • Audiobook: 4 hrs and 17 mins

What genre is The Power of Full Engagement?

Business, Self Help, Productivity

What are the chapters in The Power of Full Engagement?

Chapter One – Fully Engaged: Energy Not Time, Is Our Most Precious Resource
Chapter Two – The Disengaged Life of Roger B.
Chapter Three – The Pulse of High Performance: Balancing Stress and Recovery
Chapter Four – Physical Energy: Fueling the Fire
Chapter Five – Emotional Energy: Transforming Threat into Challenge
Chapter Six – Mental energy: Appropriate Focus and Realistic Optimism
Chapter Seven – Spiritual Energy: He Who Has a Why to Live

What are good quotes from The Power of Full Engagement?

“As Aristotle said: “We are what we repeatedly do.” Or as the Dalai Lama put it more recently: “There isn’t anything that isn’t made easier through constant familiarity and training. Through training we can change; we can transform ourselves.”

“Energy, not time, is the fundamental currency of high performance.”

“To be fully engaged, we must be physically energized, emotionally connected, mentally focused and spiritually aligned with a purpose beyond our immediate self-interest.”

“Rituals also help us to create structure in our lives.”

“Watching television is the mental and emotional equivalent of eating junk food.”

“The simple, almost embarrassing reality is that we feel too busy to search for meaning.”

“Gallup found that the key drivers of productivity for employees include whether they feel cared for by a supervisor or someone at work; whether they have received recognition or praise during the past seven days; and whether someone at work regularly encourages their development. Put another way, the ability to communicate consistently positive energy lies at the heart of effective management.”

“Energy, Not Time, Is Our Most Precious Resource”

“The more exacting the challenge, the more rigorous our rituals need to be.”

“It is a mark of courage to set aside self-interest in order to be of service to others or to a cause.”

“In his Treatise on Painting, da Vinci wrote, “It is a very good plan every now and then to go away and have a little relaxation. . . . When you come back to the work your judgment will be surer since to remain constantly at work will cause you to lose the power of judgment.”

“The most important organizational resource is energy.”

― Jim Loehr and Tony Schwartz – The Power of Full Engagement: Managing Energy, Not Time, Is the Key to High Performance and Personal Renewal

What are key takeaways from The Power of Full Engagement?

Takeaway #1 Understanding Energy

There are 4 dimensions of energy that must be harmonized for us to succeed. These are physical energy, emotional energy, mental energy, and spiritual energy. If you lack physical energy you’ll automatically lack the other 3 types of energy. Physical energy comes from exercising. Mental energy comes from being creative and maintaining a positive outlook on life. Spiritual energy comes from your integrity, passion, and character and can be boosted by volunteering. Emotional energy is managed by keeping your self-confidence and empathy on a high-note and being able to self-regulate.

We must build up our emotional, mental, and spiritual energies in exactly the same way as we do physical endurance – By pushing ourselves a little harder, a little further each time and then allowing enough recovery time. It might feel uncomfortable, especially to begin with, but with time and practice the benefits are seen and felt within us.

Takeaway #2 Increase Your Good Habits & Rituals

Following specific rituals, habits, and patterns ensure you keep each of your 4 energy levels topped up and results in you being able to complete all the tasks you need and want to do whether at work or in your personal life.

Good habits to maintain each of the 4 energy levels include getting enough quality sleep, staying hydrated, exercising regularly, eating a balanced diet of 5-7 small meals per day, practicing patience, being honest, planning the things you need to get done that day/week, staying positive and more. Negative habits, whether that’s eating too much junk food, not getting enough sleep, rushing around because you didn’t plan your day, and multitasking all drain your energy also depleting stored energy levels so that you feel sluggish.

Takeaway #3 Sprint Through Life and You’ll Enjoy More Breaks!

Most people get through the workday (and indeed life) as if they’re running a marathon, they’ll multitask, work for 8 hours solid with only a 1 hour break, and at the end of the day wonder where the time went and what they actually achieved. In a nutshell, we spend too much of our lives using up our energy without taking the time to recover it. Just as a car needs to be filled up after a certain amount of mileage, so too must we take the time to ‘fill up’ each of our 4 energy levels!

By practicing oscillation, spending and then recovering our energy we can reach higher performance. Taking the work day for example, if you were to act like a sprinter, laser-focusing your energy and working on just 1 thing for 90-120 minutes you would achieve more in a shorter time.

Rest time is also vital, in the same way that athletes take rest days after training and competing, so too must you schedule in time to rest after intense times of mental and focused thought, even if the ‘rest’ is by doing some less-intensive work such as answering emails.

* Key sources: Amazon, Wikipedia

 
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Reviewer

Tal Gur is a location independent entrepreneur, author, and impact investor. After trading his daily grind for a life of his own daring design, he spent a decade pursuing 100 major life goals around the globe. His most recent book and bestseller, The Art of Fully Living - 1 Man, 10 Years, 100 Life Goals, has set the stage for his new mission: elevating society to its abundance potential.